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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
stock and interact with clients, and secondly, a hospitable government environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the fcc making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship, and people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy, and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbedded the floors sewed clothes, and cut my hair, but now we are blessed by the american dream, and i want to keep it alive for others. the third role is the entrepreneur, the role i played. entrepreneur, hospitable governmental environment, and the workers are what create success in america. we have to keep the three legs of the stool strong and vibrant. >> thank you for the opening statement. i'll ask one or two, and then we'll go around the table. especially interested to hear you talk about obama create the legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke on society saying the obama administration wants to, quote, annihilate the r
to people that live in solano county to help prescription abuse and protect the environment. >>> well the city of new orleans says they are ready to welcome the 49ers when the team flies there tomorrow night. the city has planned for the super bowl for the past two years. they have spent close to $750 million renovating the super dome, convention center as well as the airport. new orleans will host the super bowl and mardi gras during the next two weeks. >> our great city, new orleans, is ready for mardi gras and thesuper bowl xlvii. nobody has done these two things ever. >> security is a priority. new orleans is adding 300 officers from outside law enforcement agencies to help with patrols. >>> president obama plans to hold wall street accountable for any wrong doing. >> but we also know the free market works best for everybody when we have smart common sense rules in place to prevent irresponsible behavior. >> in this morning's weekly address, the president highlighted his nomination of mary jo white to the exchange commission and richard cordre for the consumer protection bureau as
counterinsurgency in the korean peninsula, very different environment, so we want to make sure we get the standards right, that we don't overengineer that either, that they are fair. and then we want to allow individuals to compete for this position. >> physical standards? >> not just physical standards. the standards we have for these military occupations generally could include everything from mental standards to physical standards. the physical standards tend to be the ones people focus on. we figured out privacy right from the start. by the way, desert storm, desert shield 1991, we did live in that kind of environment where we were essentially somewhat nomadic in saudi arabia eventually iraq we figured out privacy. >> the fact is that was one of the concerns at the time, but the fact is that they have rejiggered to be able to adapt to that kind of situation. women are fighter pilots now. so air force, navy has lived in that direction. the marines and the army obviously you're going to live in the same direction. there will have to be some adjustments in some situations, but again, based on the
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> coming up, the republican doom and gloom vision of the obama economy just doesn't seem to match reality these days. i'll have the details coming up. >>> and while whistle-blowers come forward to describe the fraud that led to the financial collapse, the department of justice isn't going after wall street's ceos. i'll ask mike papantonio why they're just being let off the hook. you can listen to my radio show on sirius xm radio noon to 3:00 a.m. -- p.m. share your thoughts with us on #edshow. we're coming right back. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a tr
-lingual time. there are so many parts of the culture where spanish is a huge part of the environment. the speaking english, saying, yes we should do this. this is a tip of the hat to the conservatives. then we change the standards we have out there from state to state. some states have adopted a multi-language requirements for some tests and different aspects of government. do we change all of that? and go right back to english? what does that say to the -- to the latino-speaking community that has spent so much time trying to foster their own language as it were. >> then, after all of that, they guild to the back of the line, for citizenship. michael, thanks for trying to simplify a very complicate the process. have a great day. >> thanks. >> weather alert for you now. an outbreak of dangerous weather. here it is, folks. take a look at the screen, across the midwest, tormaido watches in effect. we will get updates from janet coming up. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of gri
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the store was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not heard anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me and on reasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles and the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because everyone they know voted against him.
? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because ever
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
wages or in a way that could get a better working environment, then it's okay. if you're not, saying your bored is going to cause some problems. >> especially if you're bored being on twitter and facebook. it depends on the category. the board upheld the filing of a reporter for the arizona daily star who was bored and posted online saying what? no overnight homicide? you're slacking, tucson. well, that was considered not acceptable for his employer at the newspaper. >> bad taste might be a problem. but what about how are companies handling this? are they being forced to expand their policies? i mean how broad does it need to be? >> the n.l.r.b. is actually urging or pushing companies to rewrite their policies so that they're in line with their new series of recommendations. so they're trying to get the cost-cos of the world and other large companies... >> target and general motors among those. >> ... to do it. wal-mart gets an a-plus because wal-mart already rewrote its policies to be more in line with what the n.l.r.b. is say joog what the chairman of the n.l.r.b. is saying is that
environment is, apparently the national retail federation polled its members and found that none actually plan to add the fee. you've got, for example, toys r us and target. they told nbc news that they would not be passing that on to shoppers. >> profit margins are so skinny when we're talking about retail. >> right. >> let's move to this. the suffering could soon be over for fans of devil dogs, ring dings and yodels. >> reportedly mckee foods that makes little debbie snack cakes is reportedly offering $25 million to $30 million for hostess brand's drake's brands. the drake assets are apparently composed mostly of intellectual property and also some equipment. >> intellectual property? >> yeah. hostess also on friday won a judge's permission to place two other bread assets on the auction block. as part of this liquidation process, richard, hostess's various brands, the bread, ringdings, twinkies, they're all being auctioned off and hopefully sold off to lucky buyers. >> i think we just did this story because we wanted to say ring dings and yodels. >> i know. >>> add another two awards for "ar
and we must leave a healthy environment and clean energy sources to our children and grandchildren. the missing piece is congress. congress is sleep walking through history. it is time to wake up. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration has confirmed that 2012 was the hottest year in the contiguous united states on record ever. and this one wasn't a close call. it did not come down to the wire. 2012 was a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. put that in context because one degree may not sound like a lot. but when you average it across an ire year, it is a huge shift. the previous warmest u.s. year on record -- 1998 -- was 4.2 degrees fahrenheit warmer than the coldest year on record, 1917. take the warmest year on record, is th1998 -- until now -- and yu take the coldest year -- 1917 -- and the span is only 4.2 degrees fahrenheit. so a 2.1 jump fahrenheit over 2011 is a seriously big change. but we're just starting to heat up. the most optimistic estimate for the end of the century i
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
says the murder of a dozen children changed the political environment. >> sandy hook, i think, really destroys all of the kind of tales that the nra is trying to weave about young people and guns. guns are positive things in the climate of america. >> reporter: feinstein of course was the author of the 199 assault weapons ban which was not renewed after it expired 10 years later, jamie. jamie: the one we've been hearing most about is the vice president who has been leading the administration's push for these new gun laws. what is he up to? >> reporter: biden is a former prosecutor. he is the author of violence against women act. he held a couple events last week including google plus hankout and roundtable at virginia commonwealth university. his criticism of assault weapons that they put police at disadvantage. cops find themselves outgunned. new york city police commissioner ray kelley said he would like an assault weapons ban but he said handguns is the big problem. >> we don't want them on the streets, make no mistake about it. but the problem is the handgun. 60% of the murders in
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
environments. it's coral reefs and they are disappearing far too quickly around the world. >> thank you. also, stick around to check out this. this is amazing. i want to show the viewers. these are birds. starlings to be exact. they are flying synchronized here. it looks like dark clouds. this is over israel. we understand they do this to find food and also to be a defense against birds of prey so they appear to be one big mass. have you ever seen anything like it? >> i have never seen anything like this with this species of birds n. the ocean, fish swarm in similar ways. it is an effective defense that confuses birds, animals. it can confuse a predator. if nothing else, it's so beautiful, isn't it? a reminder of the wonder of nature. how graflt we should be that there are still sights like this left in the world. >> it is beautiful. it reminds me of hitchcock's "the birds," too. there are two sides to it. just saying. >> indeed. that's in the back of one's mind. >> thanks. good to see you. >>> imagine this -- living in smog that's so thick you would be willing to pay money for a lung full of
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
more. you want to dress in layers and dress properly for the environment. >> is there a big difference in terms of elderly and young people in ways that tech really get sick and -- they can really get sick and suffer illness? >> definitely. older people have a decreased cold tolerance. they don't sense the cold as quickly as younger people do. plus they have other health concerns as well that affect their ability to be warm and to remain warm in cold climates. they also take a lot of medications which can decrease their ability to stay warm, so they're definitely a high risk category as well as infants. infants really can't tell you when they're cold, and they have a decreased ability to tolerate cold, cold temperatures, so it's important to check on both of those extremes. >> i know you brought some props in to show us what we can do to protect ourselves. >> i did. grandma already taught us this, but maintaining a good diet and staying healthy includes lots of fruits and vegetables. you need to drink a lot of water as well, and people say, oh, why do i need to drink water? your skin g
states to operate in an international environment, and it's clearly a threat to our economic prosperity. and i want to make it clear, nobody on this side of the aisle is talking about default. none of us are talking about default. we're talking about a serious solution going forward with a big problem which is widely acknowledged to be a spending problem. now, several of you made a number of points. mr. casey, you talked about congress having the power of the purse and using it wisely, with discretion to enact spending reforms which are desperately needed. mr. hoagland talked about going back to regular order, something we all believe needs to happen. you also mentioned temporary, extraordinary measures that are currently being used and talked a little bit about prioritization. and i want to bring that up again in a moment. mr. foster, you spoke about process not being a substitute for real policy reforms. we all agree with that. i think both sides could agree with that. but the bottom line is this, we have a spending problem, and we have to also recognize that in the context of how it
like he does will have to be more comfortable with that sport as it pushes toward a safer environment with less violence. we will witness what it look like a week from now. it is one topic the president was comfortable weighing in on. >> a couple of new insights from the president there. white house correspondent peter alexander, thank you so much. >>> new today, renewed fights over how to deal with the federal budget. dick durbin is defending what president obama said in his inauguration speech. >> what i heard the president say was programs like social security, medicare and medicaid, critically important for our future and we need to have a bipartisan commitment to make them work. bob and i have been in a lot of meetings talks about deficit reductions. i think we need reform in these programs that means they will live on to serve future generations. that's the message i took from the president. >> former republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan said the gop needs to recommend at this times approach with voters looking forward. >> we have to expand our appeal. we had to expan
his candidacy on social issues. what about today with the fiscal environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the presid
on principles but also have civility and i think we can do a little bit to improve the environment. host: sasha on twitter is advocating for more specifics when you talk about earmarks for your district. is it hard as an incoming freshman to take the lumps of what it means to cut spending for your constituents? guest: cutting my own budget by 10% is a significant reduction, and beyond that we have reached a point as a nation where there will be no sacred cows. the pledge we made as a house republican team is that our budget will balance in 10 years and now paul ryan budget of just last year had a lot of praise, and rightfully so because it was the only show in town, but it balance in about 20 years. that is a remarkable difference. you will see means testing of social security and medicare, probably benefit reductions that would apply to folks closer to 60 in age and a specific plan of proposals that we will roll out in the budget committee over the next couple of months. listen, we are not quick -- kidding. we have to stop spending meet -- money we do not have as a nation. host: commerce and l
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
somehow people who pay taxes are not demonized? that is novel in this political environment. bill: education will fight that. they will say, give it towards schools. >> right. bill: i would say when i heard the story, sarah palin had a lay on the books in alaska that returned oil receipts to taxpayers in that state? >> that is natural resource under the ground. saying all alaskans should enjoy that. this is a little different. what texas is saying we've got an amazing economic boom. this is what rick perry is saying. this is your money. this is a novel part of it. when we hear most politicians talk about taxes, it is almost as if we work and their money. whatever we get in our check is, hey,. bill: take, take. if he gets this and is successful they will crown the guy thing. there is another big topic i want to roll in here. we ask viewers questions all the time. gdp number was paltry that came out earlier. because you asked, bya, we get this question right now. explain the rise in the stock market versus lowering expectations and consumer sentiment and debt. you've got a dow bumpi
and a resource officers, and promoting and supporting in nurturing school environment, not one that is punitive. we must stop suspending kids out of school. we rarely saw kids get suspended. we rarely saw a kid get expelled and now it is a common phenomenon. we need to keep our arms around these kids so they are in our communities. thank you for the opportunity to testify. i may have to leave a little early to catch a flight back, but thank you for having me. >> ms. campbell. >> thank you for inviting me to speak at today's hearing. i'm proud to work for the national council for behavioral health, a national membership organization representing more than 2000 organizations that provide mental health and addiction treatment in almost every community. they provide services to more than 8 million children, adults, and family. today, a one to cover three. -- existing federal reporting law, the ongoing need for improved treatment among veterans, and the need for better public education about the nature of mental health and addiction. our members and board come from every corner of the country and ha
in that position and understand fully what these trainees think about this environment. and how challenging it would be, you know, looking back at my time and my experience to talk about things like this. sometimes it is very challenging. so as much as we want people to do certain things, i think we have to deal with the reality of the environment they are in and try to think about it from their perspective. part of this has to do with getting more feedback from trainees and looking at those barriers. i think the most important element or decision we can make in this regard has to do with trust. at the end of the day, if people don't trust either a person or institution there isn't anything we can do in terms of train ling that is going to have them take that decision as what they perceive as perm risk. as we train our instructors how we relate to the trainees. how we train other people within this environment to relate to trainees, who we try to ensure that they have that level of trust and confidence -- within the system is part of the work we are undertaking. i don't have the answer toda
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)